Archive for the Dupont Circle Category

Stikman in Dupont

Posted in Dupont Circle, Street Art on August 7, 2009 by Kent

If memory serves me, this Stikman is on the west side of Dupont Circle in the crosswalk at P Street.Stikman at P Street west of Dupont Circle

Then and Now: The Toronto Apartment Building

Posted in Condos/Apartments, Dupont Circle, Then and Now with tags , , on July 28, 2009 by Kent

Toronto ApartmentThe Toronto, located at the southwest corner of 20th and P Streets, NW, began life in 1908. An April 12, 1908, article in the Washington Times described the beginnings of the Toronto in this manner.

Work was commenced last week on the six-story apartment house to be erected at Twentieth and P streets northwest, by Thomas H. Pickford. The architect, A. H. Beers, has also submitted final designs, which have been accepted, for a structure to cost $125,000.

The building will face eighty feet on Twentieth street and ninety feet on P street, with the entrance on the latter street. The materials to be used are gray brick ad stone, while the frame will be of steel.

Perhaps the most noticeable feature of the building and the one that will most quickly attract the attention of apartment hunters is the abundance of light afforded by the unusual number of windows. On the P street front the plans provide for twenty-five bay windows, with three windows each, and thirty-eight other windows. The Twentieth street front has a corresponding number.

There are to be six apartments on each floor, of four, six, and eight rooms each, an arrangement not found in many Washington apartment houses.

Mr. Pickford expects to have the building ready by the first of October. This is one on the largest pieces of private building now in progress in the District, and will afford employment to a large number of men through the summer. Its completion will add another high-grade apartment building to the already large number constructed in recent years.

Apartment at 20th and  P, NW
Other than being painted, the exterior of the building hasn’t changed that much over the years, as you can see from the images below. It does appear that a decorative cornice has been lost over the years.
Toronto Apartment
Two close up details of the bay window decorations are after the jump Continue reading

Stikman at New Hampshire Ave & Dupont Circle

Posted in Dupont Circle, Street Art with tags , , on July 15, 2009 by Kent

This Stikman is on the north side of Dupont Circle. Its actually in the crosswalk that goes into the circle rather than across New Hampshire Ave.
Stikman @ Dupont Circle and New Hampshire Ave

Dupont Circle ca. 1886

Posted in Dupont Circle, Parks with tags , on July 14, 2009 by Kent

This plan is from the 1887 Report of the Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army.Dupont Circle plan 1887It matches up well with this view of Dupont Circle from a period postcard, which I’ve posted before.
Dupont Park
A list of the types of trees and shrubs that were in the park in 1887 is after the jump Continue reading

Stikman with Head Injury

Posted in Dupont Circle, Street Art with tags , , on July 10, 2009 by Kent

This Stikman is on the north side of Dupont Circle in the crosswalk across 19th Street. Seems he’s taken one too many to his head.
Stikman at 19th St and Dupont Circle

Fading Stikman

Posted in Dupont Circle, Street Art with tags , , on July 7, 2009 by Kent

Frequently, when you see a Stikman it has held up fairly well. I think its easy to forget how ephemeral they are. This example is clearly showing signs of age and the abuse of traffic.
Fading Stikman

Then and Now: 2121 Massachusetts Ave., NW

Posted in Dupont Circle, Then and Now with tags , , on July 6, 2009 by Kent

Townsend House 1915Then: The Townsend Mansion ca. 1915. The home was built by Mary Scott Townsend, the daughter of William L. Scott, a Pennsylvania railroad and coal magnate who became a member of Congress.

Cosmos ClubNow: The building has been home to the Cosmos Club since the club purchased the property in 1950.

History: The mansion in its current state was created when Mrs. Townsend had the original 1873 home of Curtis Hillyer enlarged and so completely rebuild that none of the original structure is noticeable. To do this, she hired a leading New York firm, Carrère and Hastings. The work began in 1899 and was essentially completed by 1901.

Mrs. Townsend became one of Washington’s social leaders, known for her elegant entertaining. Her husband, Richard H. Townsend, died shortly after the house was completed, but she continue to live there until her death in 1931.

Mrs. Townsend’s only child, Mathilde Townsend Welles, and her husband, B. Sumner Welles, President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Under Secretary of State (from 1934 to 1943), lived in the mansion until World War II when it was leased to the Canadian Women’s Army Corps.

Images of the home ca. 1915, when Mrs Townsend lived there, are after the jump. Continue reading