Archive for August, 2009

All Good Things Must Come to an End …

Posted in Uncategorized on August 7, 2009 by Kent

Due to a number of reasons, I’ve decided that this was my last day to actively post on Washington Kaleidoscope. I’d like to thank everyone that’s joined me on this journey, and tell you to fear not … there are still plenty of fish in the sea.

I’ll continue to post items of Washington’s past and present on Greater Greater Washington. I encourage you to check that blog out if you haven’t already done so. Its got some great stuff.

If you have been reading Kaleidoscope because you are interested in Park View news, history, and such, you can continue to follow those posts on my new blog Park View, D.C. I’ll also slowly cross post relevant Park View items from Kaleidoscope over to the new blog as time permits.

If you have just been enjoying the random observations, street art, and the like, there are plenty of other blogs out there that post such items, and I’m sure you’ll find one you like (although, I won’t promise that the occasional street art or neon won’t show up on the new blog … I like them too much).

So whether we meet again or part company at this juncture … so long, and thanks for all the fish!

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Lost Washington: Carbery House

Posted in Foggy Bottom, Lost Washington with tags , on August 7, 2009 by Kent

The Carbery House was built in 1818 at the northwest corner of 17th and C Streets, opposite the Ellipse. It was the residence of Thomas Carbery, mayor of Washington and a noted member of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church.
Carbery House

Carbery became active in the public affairs of Washington in 1819 when he was elected to the city council. He remained active until his death in 1863.

While the house was no stranger to tragedy — his wife and four children died there within a short time in the 1830s — it was more famously known as “Miracle House” due to the widely publicized recovery of Thomas’ gravely ill sister, Mrs. Ann Carbery Mattingly. She had been ill since 1817 and, being widowed, was invited to live in the house upon its completion. She grew increasingly worse prompting the family to consent to a priest  writing Prince Hohenlohe of Hamburg, Germany. Hohenlohe was a known healer, and agreed to pray for Ann’s recovery.On the date and time that Hohenlohe stated he’d pray for recovery, Ann rose from her bed being completely healed.

The house itself was built in the Federal style, though the entrance was atypically located on the side rather than the front. The cast-iron porch was an 1840 addition. Carbery House was eventually razed in 1903.

Stikman in Dupont

Posted in Dupont Circle, Street Art on August 7, 2009 by Kent

If memory serves me, this Stikman is on the west side of Dupont Circle in the crosswalk at P Street.Stikman at P Street west of Dupont Circle

1967 Ford Mustang

Posted in Vintage Vehicles with tags on August 7, 2009 by Kent

1967 Ford Mustang (detail)In 1967, Ford’s Mustang saw its first major redesign. For the first time since its launch, the car faced some serious competition. This resulted in Ford evaluating the Mustang’s strengths and weaknesses.

In addition to the Pontiac’s Firebird, Mercury’s Cougar, and Plymouth’s Barracuda, Chevrolet had plans to roll out their new Chevy Camaro muscle car. This resulted in Ford duking it out with its competition by creating a more muscular and powerful Ford Mustang.
1967 Ford Mustang
1967 Ford Mustang (detail)
1967 Ford Mustang (detail)

Neon Traffic Indicators on 17th Street

Posted in Downtown, Neon with tags , on August 7, 2009 by Kent

Neon Traffic sign -- malfunction17th Street becomes a one way south street during the morning rush, and these neon signs are to remind drivers at intersections of that fact. This one has malfunctioned, and the arrow stays on. The signs are to flash between the arrow and the words “one way.” This sign is located between the Mayflower Hotel and the National Geographic Building.

You can get an idea of how they function from the photos below.
Neon Traffic sign
Neon Traffic sign

Progress on Park View Murals

Posted in Art by Genre, Park View with tags , , on August 7, 2009 by Kent

I took these shots last Sunday when the main artist, with some help, was working overtime to get the new murals at the Park View Rec Center further along. I’ll post some updates next week. I’m sure there will be a noticeable difference.
Mural at Park View Rec Center
Mural at Park View Rec Center

This Date in History

Posted in August with tags on August 7, 2009 by Kent

August 7, 1925: With a simple, impressive ceremony local Sons of the Revolution observed the 182nd anniversary of the birth of Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene with the placement of a wreath on his statue in Stanton park. Maj. Gen. John L. Hines, deputy chief of staff, laid the wreath in the name of the order.

Nathaniel Greene ceremonies